[Expyezp] y sobre el estado del arte

julio shalom julioshalom at gmail.com
Wed Jul 2 13:42:00 PDT 2008


en todo caso  yo primero soñaba con ser extrella de rock,.,.,, mas adelante
con tocar las goldberg, y hoy en dìa , en obtener cierto merito, cierto
respeto , cierta reputacion como compositor de una cosa que no se que es,
que se discute y se discute, con promesas para hoy mañana, pero en la
realidad, hay tanto para escuchar que ,, bueno .. soy uan estrella, pero ..
hay mas estrellas que humanos,  y a ellas no les preocupa brillar,  a mi  no
sè ,,, para que hago mùsica?: eso me tiene pensando: que debì haber acpetado
el trabajo como mozo de peluquerìa en vez de seguir tan de cerca mi propia
inscertidumbre.

los quiere a todosç

Oscar Julio desde chile....   con unas ganas ni las hijueputas de volver.

2008/7/2 Juan I Reyes <juanig at maginvent.org>:

>
> -------- Forwarded Message --------
> From: renzo filinich orozco <rfo78_ludz at hotmail.com>
> To: juanig at maginvent.org
> Subject: RE: [Expyezp] y sobre el estado del arte
> Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2008 19:54:43 +0000
>
> Hola leyendo los puntos de vista de Juan y Julian creo en definitiva es
> una mezcla de ambos,es tan simple como ver el trabajo de un escultor que
> tiene buen material para trabajar su escurltura y otro del que solo
> trabajo con greda y barro.Desde mi punto de vista concuerdo con Julian
> de que el tema de la musica ya desde tiempo atras va hacia el doing
> yourself!! mas aun ahora que existen Net labels ya el sacar un disco es
> cosa de cada dia sin necesidad de salir de tu casa en tu Pc o con un
> microfono grabando lo que pase por tu puerta,etc etc... Pero eso igual
> conlleva que se cree una especie de catarsis en la estetica compositiva
> que es sobre lo que Juan creo plantea un tratamiento  adecuado a la hora
> de componer y si en ese aspecto la musica tiene mas relevancia que el
> "medio",sin dejar de lado que uno igual con pocos elementos puede
> generar muchas cosas interesantes...un saludo y un abrazo desde Chile.
> Renzo Filinich
> www.myspace.com/renzofilinichmetastasis
> > From: juanig at Maginvent.ORG
> > To: expyezp at lists.slow.tk
> > Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2008 15:29:25 -0400
> > Subject: [Expyezp] y sobre el estado del arte
>  >
> >
> > En el espíritu del email de Julian hace una semana.
> >
> > Este artículo del NYT sobre la ecuación de los medios. En otras
> > palabras: no son los medios de comunicación lo que importa sino mas
> bien
> > la música.
> >
> >
> >
> ========================================================================
> >
> >
> > The Media Equation
> > Live Music Thrives as CDs Fade
> > By DAVID CARR
> > Published: June 23, 2008
> >
> > A little over a week ago, Patterson Hood, a guitarist and singer in
> > the Drive-By Truckers, stood in front of a sleepy but amped noon
> crowd
> > at Bonnaroo, the music festival in Manchester, Tenn., explaining
> > profanely that it was time to, um, wake up. As he kicked into "The
> > Righteous Path," a song from the group's new-ish record "Brighter
> Than
> > Creation's Dark," it was if the space in front of him was filled with
> > sunburned bobble-heads, each bouncing in unison to every word:
> "Trying
> > to hold steady on the righteous path, 80 miles an hour with a
> worn-out
> > map."
> >
> > Like much of Bonnaroo, the set was a display of the fealty between
> > band and audience so thunderous that you barely hear the sound of a
> > dying business.
> >
> > Yes, the traditional music industry is in the tank — record sales are
> > off another 10 percent this year and the Virgin Megastore in Times
> > Square is closing, according to a Reuters report, joining a host of
> > other record stores. That would seem to be bad news all around for
> > music fans — 70,000 of whom showed up in this remote place to watch
> > 158 bands play — and for Mr. Hood and his band.
> >
> > Not so, he says.
> >
> > "The collapse of the record business has been good for us, if
> > anything. It's leveled the playing field in a way where we can keep
> > slugging it out and finding our fans," he said while toweling himself
> > off after the set.
> >
> > With their epic Southern rock sounds whose influences range from
> > William Faulkner to Lynyrd Skynyrd and the kind of musicians who
> don't
> > live for a photo shoot, the Drive-By Truckers were never going to be
> > record industry darlings. As it is, they have found a sustainable,
> > blue-collar business model of rock stardom in which selling concert
> > tickets and T-shirts have replaced selling CDs.
> >
> > "Thank God they can't download those," said Mr. Hood, the son of the
> > famed Muscle Shoals Sound Studio bassist David Hood. "They follow us
> > from city to city, see the shows, get drunk and buy shirts."
> >
> > After investing early and continuously in the Web, the Drive-By
> > Truckers have a MySpace page with 37,000 friends, offering four songs
> > from "Brighter Than Creation's Dark" with almost 800,000 downloads
> > alongside a touring schedule that would put James Brown in his prime
> > to shame. This week, they will be in five cities and two countries
> > (Canada, remember?).
> >
> > Before file sharing tipped over the music business, bands used to
> tour
> > in support of a record. Now they tour to get the dough to make a
> > record. Cheap recording technology, along with all manner of
> > electronic distribution, means that bands don't need to sign with a
> > giant recording label to get their music out there.
> >
> > It has been going on a while. Ani DiFranco, the singer/songwriter,
> saw
> > the future back in 1991 and skipped signing with a label, making her
> > own records instead. "She would tour, endlessly, in her Volkswagen
> > bug, and have two envelopes, one for the gig money and one for the
> > record money," said Scot Fisher, the manager and president of
> > Righteous Babe Records, the label they created.
> >
> > There are still pop acts that drop a record from on high with the
> help
> > of a big label and see touring as a nuisance, but Bonnaroo in
> > particular is a place where bands and fans have a much closer
> > relationship, with direct sales of merchandise and recorded product.
> > It can make for intimate ties: a woman in a cowboy hat who was
> > carpeted with tattoos was asked the name of a particular song. "I
> > don't know what the name is, but I know who it's about," she said,
> > with a wink.
> >
> > In a sure sign of détente between the old and new faces of the
> > business, Metallica, which very publicly went after file-sharers with
> > corrosive rhetoric and aggressive legal tactics, showed up at
> Bonnaroo.
> >
> > Back in the day, Metallica had good facts — downloaders were stealing
> > their work — and a bad argument, one that could not stand up to a
> > shift in paradigm where many fans walk around with their entire music
> > collection in a shirt pocket. "We support live music," the band's
> > singer and guitarist, James Hetfield, told the cheering hordes.
> >
> > Established bands like Metallica and Pearl Jam, which also played
> > Bonnaroo, may have taken some hits on overall sales. But the lower
> > (iTunes) and nonexistent (file-sharing) profit margins on recorded
> > product are a little easier to take, because ticket prices have
> > doubled in the last 10 years, according to Gary Bongiovanni, editor
> in
> > chief of Pollstar, a trade magazine that covers the live music
> industry.
> >
> > For some bands, like the jam band Umphrey's McGee, some music sales
> > are a direct offshoot of the shows. The band reserves five tickets at
> > every show for people who want to tape it and also records every set
> > with room mikes and the sound board. Three-disc sets are burned on
> the
> > spot and sold for $20. (Other bands have taken to popping the
> > evening's performance onto a thumb drive and selling that to
> departing
> > fans.)
> >
> > "If we can break even on a recording, then the rest of the business
> > will take care of itself," said Joel Cummins, the keyboard player in
> > the band. "I think that the Internet gives us a way of getting
> > connected with our fans. We get to make the kind of music we like —
> > it's definitely a little more complicated than just three chords and
> > the truth — and use a long-tail business model to find and play for
> > people who want to see what we can do live."
> >
> > The buy-share-trade dynamic was visible all over Bonnaroo, whether it
> > was food, space in the tent or other substances. To one crusty old
> > attendee, it felt a bit like the Yippie camp-in at Spokane that he
> > stumbled onto back in 1974. (Speaking of which, when did tie-dye come
> > back, and how can we make it go away again?)
> >
> > But for musicians, the network is all part of the business. Selling
> > out, once the death knell for bands seeking credibility, has now
> > become an end in itself.
> >
> > "This is by far our best record, if you ask me, so the tickets for
> > shows are doing really well," said Mr. Hood, sounding very much like
> > an old label hand. "But then, the gas prices are killing us."he Media
> > Equation
> >
> > E-mail: carr at nytimes.com
> >
> > _______________________________________________
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>
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-- 
Julio Sha
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